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Baharat Spiced Beef Stew (A Wacky Stew)

by Spicie Foodie on January 11, 2011

beef; stew; beef stew; Baharat; Bharat; spice; spices; spiced; Turkey spices; carrot; potato; Russet Pototo; onions; spring onions; chives; red pepper; chile; sweet pepper; food; fusion; cuisine; Turkish; spicy; hot; red; orange; brown; gold; spoon; leeks; vegetable beef stew; soup; potage; sopa picante; guisado picante; guisade de Turkia; sopa de carne; carne; papas

Baharat Spiced Beef Stew, one whacked out stew! What’s so wacky about it you ask? Well, I’ll tell you. It’s mix of Eurasian with a dash of central European, a pinch of Hungarian, and a splash of Indian mish-mash fusion throw it all in kinda stew. (That was a mouthful!) So as you can see this was one of those meals where whatever I had in the refrigerator and spice cabinet went into the pot. I have to admit that I love cooking this way, and most times I end up with great results that lead me to experiment in ways I wouldn’t have if I had planned ahead. This experiment mish-mash was a hit! We both really liked the hearty, warming stew that was spiced so well with the dominant flavors coming from a delicious spice called Baharat.

beef; stew; beef stew; Baharat; Bharat; spice; spices; spiced; Turkey spices; carrot; potato; Russet Pototo; onions; spring onions; chives; red pepper; chile; sweet pepper; food; fusion; cuisine; Turkish; spicy; hot; red; orange; brown; gold; spoon; leeks; vegetable beef stew; soup; potage; sopa picante; guisado picante; guisade de Turkia; sopa de carne; carne; papas

Baharat (Bahārāt) is a spice mixture commonly used in Arab, Persian and Turkish cuisine. *Bahārāt is the Arabic word for ‘spices’ (the plural form of bahār ‘spice’). The mixture of finely ground spices is often used to season lamb, fish, chicken, beef, and soups. Additionally, it may be used as a condiment, to add more flavor after a meal has been prepared. On CHOW.com Baharat is explained as usually containing hot spices (such as paprika, chiles, and black pepper), sweet spices (such as allspice, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom), warm spices (such as cumin and coriander), and resinous herbs (such as savory and mint). There are several varieties with different combinations of spices. In North Africa, crushed dried rose petals may appear in the mix. It flavors lamb, beef dishes, and tomato sauce.

beef; stew; beef stew; Baharat; Bharat; spice; spices; spiced; Turkey spices; carrot; potato; Russet Pototo; onions; spring onions; chives; red pepper; chile; sweet pepper; food; fusion; cuisine; Turkish; spicy; hot; red; orange; brown; gold; spoon; leeks; vegetable beef stew; soup; potage; sopa picante; guisado picante; guisade de Turkia; sopa de carne; carne; papas

Serves 2
Ingredients:
10.5 oz. or 300 grams lean stewing beef, cubed
3 small carrots, sliced diagonally into 4 pieces
1 small yellow onion, roughly chopped
1 small leek, thinly sliced and only bottom white section
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 small sweet red pepper, roughly chopped (can substitute with 1 red bell pepper)
8 very small potatoes, halved (I didn’t peel them)

1 tbsp. Turkish Bahart spice
1/2 tbsp. sweet Paprika for mild stew and chile (Cayenne) powder for spicier stew
1 tsp. ground Turmeric powder
1 tsp. cumin seed
salt & black pepper to taste
1-2 tbsp. sunflower oil or olive oil
4 cups of beef broth or 1 low sodium (no MSG) beef bouillon cube dissolved in 4 cups water

Optional toppings:
thinly sliced green/spring onions or fresh cilantro

1. Pat dry the beef with paper towels then set aside. Heat the oil in a large pot, brown the beef then remove from pot and set aside. In the same pot fry the onion until translucent. Add the garlic and leeks and fry for 2 min. Then add the rest of the vegetables and fry for another 5 minutes. Add the beef back to the pot and sprinkle all of the spices into the pot. Stir the pot to distribute spices well and throughout the ingredients.
2. Pour the broth into the pot, cover and under medium low heat simmer until the vegetables are soft and the beef is tender. If needed you can add more water depending on how watery or how much broth you prefer the stew to have.

Serve: The stew can be enjoyed on it’s own as a filling lunch or a light dinner. It can also be served with crusty bread or steamed rice on the side.

beef; stew; beef stew; Baharat; Bharat; spice; spices; spiced; Turkey spices; carrot; potato; Russet Pototo; onions; spring onions; chives; red pepper; chile; sweet pepper; food; fusion; cuisine; Turkish; spicy; hot; red; orange; brown; gold; spoon; leeks; vegetable beef stew; soup; potage; sopa picante; guisado picante; guisade de Turkia; sopa de carne; carne; papas

As you can see the Eurasian flavor comes in from the Turkish Baharat that was the foundation of the stew flavor. The Indian comes from the cumin and the turmeric. The central European comes from the leeks and potatoes so commonly used in local cuisine. The Hungarian comes from the paprika that can be used and from the sweet Hungarian red peppers used in the stew. They are called Kapia and are also very common in other Central European countries. The photo below is an orange Kapia,I didn’t have any red Kapia lefotver to shoot, but they look the same.

Kapie; Kapie Peppers; Kapia; Kapia Peppers; pepper; sweet peppers; orange; wood table; food; vegetables; oraganic; fresh; healthy; hungarian; hungarian peppers; hungarian paprika

Have any of you ever used Baharat blend? and If so which variety,I’m curious if the Tunisian version with the rose petals taste like flowers? (By the way this was one of the recipes included in the Spicie Foodie 2011 Calendar. You can see it on the sidebar.)

in Soups/Stews,Spice Mixtures

{ 32 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Sandra January 11, 2011 at 6:27 PM

Oh my goodness..photos are mouthwatering! It looks so good! Nicely done Nancy!

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2 Belinda @zomppa January 11, 2011 at 6:58 PM

This is totally my kind of wacky stew. Going to save this one!

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3 Rita January 11, 2011 at 7:12 PM

That is why I love to come here; I know I will learn something new. I have never heard of Baharat and now you have told be all about it.I woudl be very surprised if I found that here. Our little corner is not sophisticated when it coms to some products. We do the best we can and sometimes I substitute. As Always your photos are superb!

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4 Dimah January 11, 2011 at 7:47 PM

Looks so delicious and tempting!

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5 Sommer J January 11, 2011 at 7:52 PM

This looks fabulous! Never heard of Baharat, but will try it out in the future. I love different spice blends!

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6 Fight the Fat Foodie January 11, 2011 at 9:48 PM

Looks incredible!

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7 Torviewtoronto January 11, 2011 at 10:16 PM

delicious blend of spices our favourite

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8 Spicie Foodie January 11, 2011 at 10:22 PM

@Sandra,Belinda,Dimah, Sommer, Fight the Fat Foodie & Torview, Thank you:)

@Rita, Thank you:) I was lucky to find the Baharat from a local Turkish shop. I would love to replicate it so if I am successful I will post it to share it for those that can't find it.

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9 Cakewhiz January 11, 2011 at 10:33 PM

That looks so tasty! And those are beautiful photographs :)

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10 Michael Toa January 11, 2011 at 11:44 PM

What a gorgeous looking stew. Looks utterly delicious. I never used baharat spices but I'll be sure to have a look around and give it a try.

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11 Claudia January 12, 2011 at 1:47 AM

Baharat is new to me – but I shall look – you never know until you seek. Stews are wonderful for coming into their own as you throw them together. I'm warmer already – just by reading this.

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12 apiciusapprentice January 12, 2011 at 2:11 AM

This is such a cool combination! I've never heard of this type of dish or baharat spice. I wish I had more luck with my “throwing what's in the pantry in the pot” adventures. Oh I have so much to learn!

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13 penny aka jeroxie January 12, 2011 at 6:16 AM

I love baharat! I use it a lot in lamb dishes…

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14 Alison January 12, 2011 at 8:02 AM

I saw the link to this on foodgawker and had to click through when I saw baharat mentioned. I've had a middle eastern cookbook for years and it has a recipe for making baharat, well, one of the versions, anyway. It accompanied a recipe for a beef and okra stew with some tamarind for extra flavor. Really delicious and the smell of the baharat is so good that I've sometimes used it as a home fragrance, boiling a bit in a pot of water! ;)

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15 Claudie January 12, 2011 at 3:27 PM

Looks really tasty! I think I might try that at the end of the week, esp. with that cold winter we've got over here! I haven't used baharat before, but my interest in Middle Eastern cuisine has just started recently, so I'll fix that really quickly!

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16 ~Lisa~ January 12, 2011 at 7:25 PM

This stew looks so hearty and comforting. I'd love some now with all this snow and cold. Lovely recipe Nancy (=

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17 Stella January 12, 2011 at 8:44 PM

Hey Nancy, I kind of cook that way too. I just take whatever I have in the fridge and meld flavors and styles of cooking according to what I know will most likely be delicious. Since I also grew up in an Algerian kitchen, a lot of my food is kind of an Algerian/American mix (I never post it though, b/c I'm afraid people will think it's weird:). Anyway, this stew sounds wonderful! It could also be called Spicie Foodie Beef Stew. Maybe (smile)?!

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18 Anca@Bistro Gerard January 12, 2011 at 10:42 PM

I love Baharat, and the red Kapia are one of my all time favourite vegetables! We can't often find them here in Australia, but they certainly bring back a lot of childhood memories! The stew looks delicious, Nancy!

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19 Anna's Table January 12, 2011 at 10:42 PM

Now that's my type of cooking….scouting out what's in the fridge and pantry. Sometimes the best meals are not planned out in advance. Great looking stew!

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20 scrambledhenfruit January 13, 2011 at 3:13 AM

I love all of the flavors here- I need to invest in some of that spice!

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21 lgdobson January 13, 2011 at 8:29 AM

I love baharat. I use a mix by Christine Manfield – the Australian Queen of Spice. It is:
2T black pepper corns
1 T coriander seeds
1 stick cinnamon
20 cloves (really)
1 T cumin seeds
seeds from 4 green caradmom pods
1t cassia
2t grated nutmeg
2T ground paprika

Grind the whole spices to a fine powder then add the ground ones. Makes 8T.

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22 Emily Malloy January 13, 2011 at 5:38 PM

This is perfection. Boy I could take some lessons from your food photography skills! :)

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23 briarrose January 13, 2011 at 6:02 PM

Beautiful stew! I love the spices.

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24 FamilySpice January 13, 2011 at 6:52 PM

Beef stew is definitely on the menu around the world! You are making my mouth water!

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25 Pacheco Patty January 16, 2011 at 5:54 AM

With this rich colored and textured tapestry, your photographs are coming to life in a deeply beautiful and appealing way. I'm loving this post Nancy!

I've never tried the Turkish spice Baharat so thanks for sharing something new to me:-)

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26 Magic of Spice January 16, 2011 at 5:30 PM

Wow, what flavors :) I am not sure if I have had that specific spice blend, but have had something similar. I will have to try and remember what it was. I am going to have to get the Bahart spice though, sounds perfect…This is a gorgeous stew, and the photos are stunning as always! I really love the one of the peppers…I think the orange came out perfect :)

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27 fromBAtoParis January 17, 2011 at 6:59 AM

Honestly, I prefer your stew !! much more color !!! I didn't know Baharat…Thanks!!

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28 ♥Sugar♥Plum♥Fairy♥ January 19, 2011 at 5:39 PM

Oh i loveee ur mishmash and fusion here , so deliciously inviting!

and so heartily warm , i so want some now , am totally hungry!

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29 Brindusa February 1, 2011 at 4:47 PM

I love spicy food, and your stew is just as I like! Can I have some?

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30 Icy BC April 7, 2011 at 7:14 PM

This looks just mouth-watering! Gorgeous photos too!

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31 A Gill May 17, 2013 at 7:48 AM

Fantastic recipe! My sister and I made this for my Mom for Mother’s Day. We made our own Baharat spice mix. Thanks for this – found it on Pinterest!

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32 Spicie Foodie May 17, 2013 at 2:45 PM

Thank you, glad to hear you enjoyed it!:)

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